New £4million for WW1 Centenary projects

Understanding the FWW
Actors performing a play about the experiences of women who worked in the Birmingham small arms factory during the war
Clocking On: a community performance depicting the experiences of female workers at the Birmingham Small Arms factory during the First World War
Demand for National Lottery money for projects marking the Centenary of the First World War has been phenomenal, reflecting the war’s significance and lasting legacy.
      
In recognition of this, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) is making an additional £4million of funding available so that even more communities can get involved.

 

Find out about this additional funding here

 

HMS M.33: an incredible story of survival from Gallipoli
w320_6493596_6484277_hmsm33v3fordotmailer_cropped
This week, the only ship to survive the 1915 Gallipoli campaign, HMS M.33, will open to the public for the first time following a major National Lottery funded restoration. In a blog for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, HLF’s new Chair Sir Peter Luff talks about his personal connection to the ship and why it’s so important that she, her crew and the campaign are remembered 100 years on.

Read Sir Peter Luff’s Blog

 

Inspired? Find out how you can take part in the Centenary
w320_6499231_fww_projects
Since the start of the Centenary, hundreds of thousands of people have been exploring the stories of the First World War that matter to them: from the role of hospitals and workers in munitions factories, to the experiences of troops from Britain and overseas and people who opposed the war.
If you would like to do a First World War Centenary project, take a look at some of the projects we have already funded for inspiration.

Find out how communities are uncovering First World War stories

 

If you are interested in studying the FWW from the HLF, you should also bear in mind the work of the Five Engagement Centres for research in this area, which are listed below:

Voices of War and Peace, University of Birmingham,
voices@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Leave a Reply